Jaime Green

Posts tagged writing

Apr 10
“Sometimes it feels like the more violent choice — I don’t know if I want to say “violent,” but certainly more intentional or aggressive — is to keep journalism and memoir separate. Every time a journalist reports a piece, she’s having a really intense experience; every time you have a conversation with another person — whether you’re doing it as a journalist or a friend — all these moments of your own past are rising up to haunt you.”

It’s Always Spilling Over The Edges

I interviewed Leslie Jamison for BuzzFeed Books. We talked about travel, parents, writing, pain, maggots, ultra-marathons, and other sorts of things one expects in an essay collection.


Mar 24
“You can pretend you’re in a tunnel. You can make believe you have on blinders. You can stare 100 yards in the distance at a random point. You can walk with urgency or purpose. You can look prickly or preoccupied. You can wear an iPod. You can make a cell phone call. You can fake a cell phone call. You can write a text message to no one.

These are the ways foreign women get down the street in Cairo. These are the tricks they share, the ways they teach me to “beige out,” as one woman put it, to fog up the glasses, whenever outside. Outside is the sphere of Egyptian men. Men run markets, crowd alleys, fill every subway car but the very middle one, marked by a huddle of headscarves. Females are scarce on Cairo’s streets, and those who do appear seem hurried, like mice suddenly exposed in the middle of a room, rushing for cover.”

Colleen Kinder, “Blot Out”

Hear Colleen read from this essay in episode 2.

(via catapultreads)


Mar 12
jaimealyse:

One week from today, seven amazing writers will be reading about everything from empathy to epilepsy, all about our brains and minds and how we understand them or don’t. Featuring poetry, fiction, and essays from:
Stefan Merrill BlockMeehan CristTimothy DonnellyLeslie JamisonMiles KleeElissa Schappelland Lynn Schmeidler.
This is for people who like science and for people who like great writing (aka all the good people in the world).
Wednesday March 12, 7pmHousing Works Bookstore Cafe (126 Crosby St.)
Free! Drinks and books on sale go to support Housing Works. (A few of those books miiiiiight be Leslie Jamison’s The Empathy Exams, a full two weeks before its official release.)

This is tonight! This has been a bananas week and when it’s done I’m gonna hibernate for a while go to Colonial Williamsburg, but first I’m hosting this awesome night of writing and science, and pencils with little erasers shaped like brains.

jaimealyse:

One week from today, seven amazing writers will be reading about everything from empathy to epilepsy, all about our brains and minds and how we understand them or don’t. Featuring poetry, fiction, and essays from:

Stefan Merrill Block
Meehan Crist
Timothy Donnelly
Leslie Jamison
Miles Klee
Elissa Schappell
and Lynn Schmeidler.

This is for people who like science and for people who like great writing (aka all the good people in the world).

Wednesday March 12, 7pm
Housing Works Bookstore Cafe (126 Crosby St.)

Free! Drinks and books on sale go to support Housing Works. (A few of those books miiiiiight be Leslie Jamison’s The Empathy Exams, a full two weeks before its official release.)

This is tonight! This has been a bananas week and when it’s done I’m gonna hibernate for a while go to Colonial Williamsburg, but first I’m hosting this awesome night of writing and science, and pencils with little erasers shaped like brains.


Mar 1

Writers: Have you ever taken pictures of the weird, extreme, radical things you do to revise your work? Dramatically marked-up pages? Cut-up pages, index cards, post-its on the wall? I want to show my students how intensively - and inventively - professional writers revise their work. Email me with anything you have.

(I’d also love if you’d reblog this.)


Feb 26
That’s like saying cows are a hybrid of horses and pigs.

That’s like saying cows are a hybrid of horses and pigs.


Jan 11

Jan 10
“Is it a problem that The Bats aren’t paid to act? It turns out that answering that question involves answering a whole lot of other sub-questions. Questions like: is acting a job? If it is, is exposure a form of payment, a kind of service in lieu of cash, perhaps? Are there mitigating circumstances that affect any of this? Does it matter that the kind of large scale, ambitious works The Bats often do at The Flea would be impossible if they had to pay their actors? Does it matter that there is the money to build an $18 million new space but seemingly no money to pay artists?”

When Is A Job Not A Job? When It’s In The Arts, Apparently. « The Hooded Utilitarian

This is about the resident unpaid acting (and labor) troupe at The Flea and The Flea’s new big building, but you don’t need me to tell you that it’s about much more than that, too.


Jan 9
“There are a lot of reasons I was excited about this interaction. First, it was a powerful moment of literacy learning for Linus. We can tell kids how to write, but things often “stick” better when they come from another child. I could see Linus leaning in and watching carefully as Zach was writing, taking it all in. And the debate about whether an L can have curvy lines? That wouldn’t have happened between him and a teacher—he would probably have just accepted the teacher’s version. The disagreement really made them pay attention to what they knew, and what they didn’t know, about writing.”

Learning to Write | The Children’s Community School Blog

Lessons, from my friend Jarrod who teaches pre-school, for teachers of students of any age.


Dec 19

What if a legitimate part of my writing process is reading tumblr and twitter for fifteen minutes after I sit down to clear my brain?


Nov 5
  • Feedback: At this point I begin to wonder *why* we are in this hall.
  • New line I added: "There are things worth seeing; you just have to have patience for the fact that they will be unremarkable and small. Important things are often unremarkable and small."

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